Languages

It is generally accepted that there were over 250 Aboriginal languages in Australia at the time of colonisation. Of these, 46 languages fall within the boundaries of South Australia. The Mobile Language Team covers the length and breadth of the state and the languages within it. We stretch as far north as the Simpson Desert, as far west at the Nullabor, east out Mt Gambier and all the way to the tip of the Fleurieu Peninsula. We work with a diverse range of communities in both regional and remote locations. In 1996 Horton published a language map to illustrate the complexities and vastness of Aboriginal languages around Australia, this is known at the Horton Tindale Map (1996). We use this map throughout our website to illustrate approximate locations of language groups, it is by no means a definitive and comprehensive geographic expression of language country, bounds or limits.

Below is a list of all the language groups that are worked on by the Mobile Language Team.

Adnyamathanha

Antikirinya

Arabana (Arabunna)

Barngarla

Bodaruwitj

Bunganditj (Boandik)

Danggali

Dhirari

Dieri

Karangura

Kaurna

Kokatha

Kulpantjatjara

Kuyani

Lower Arrernte

Maintangk

Malyangapa

Mirning

Nakako

Narungga

Nauo/Nawu

Ngadjuri

Ngalea

Ngamini

Ngangaruku

Ngarkat

Ngarrindjeri

Ngawadj

Ngayawang

Nukunu

Peramangk

Pirlatapa

Pitjantjatjara

Ramindjeri

Southern Pitjantjatjara

Thangal/Tanganekald

Wadigali

Wangkangurru

Wilyakali

Wirangu

Yadliawara

Yandruwantha

Yankunytjatjara

Yaraldi

Yarluyandi

Yawarawarka

Yirawirung

DISCLAIMER: The above map is based upon the Horton Indigenous Map of Australia © Aboriginal Studies Press, AIATSIS, and Auslig/Sinclair, Knight, Merz, 1996. The full map is available on the AIATSIS website. The locations of the languages of SA, as stated on the this website are not intended for Land Claim use, and are an approximate guide only. Individual language project locations are based on information from publicly available MILR (ILS) documents.

DISCLAIMER:

The above map is based upon the Horton Indigenous Map of Australia © Aboriginal Studies Press, AIATSIS, and Auslig/Sinclair, Knight, Merz, 1996. The full map is available on the AIATSIS website. The locations of the languages of SA, as stated on the this website are not intended for Land Claim use, and are an approximate guide only. Individual language project locations are based on information from publicly available MILR (ILS) documents.

 

 

Language Groups

Linguistically the languages the MLT works with are divided into 9 different groups. These groups are not definitive but help to categorise and organise the wide array of languages that are present within South Australia.